Best Tech Stories around the web #165

On the program this week: 3D printed sushis for a perfect 8-bit meal, Bose's augmented glasses using sound, VR marketing for non-profit organisations, a robot smashes Rubik's Cube record and the curious Pi Bike.

INNOVATION

3D-printed sushi looks like the perfect 8-bit meal by cnet.com

Open Meals wants to make sure we can print our favorite foods -- even if they look like pixelated video game meals -- wherever and whenever we like. Read more

Bose’s augmented reality glasses use sound instead of sight by theverge.com

Augmented reality is almost exclusively associated with vision, but it doesn’t have to be. Audio company Bose announced a project it’s calling “Bose AR” at this year’s SXSW festival, and it showed off a pair of prototype glasses that demonstrate what sound-based AR might look and feel like. The company plans to ship 10,000 of these glasses to developers and manufacturers this summer, with the intent of partnering with other eyewear companies. Read more

CREATIVE CONTENT

VR Marketing For Non-Profit Organisations by vrfocus.com

Yulio Technologies' Rob Kendal discusses how charities and other organisations are using virtual reality to tell their stories. Read more

QUERKY

Robot smashes Rubik’s Cube record with 0.38-second solve by arstechnica.com

Robot smashes Rubik’s Cube record with 0.38-second solve
Hardware hackers Ben Katz and Jared Di Carlo have smashed the previous record for solving the Rubik's cube robotically. Their machine solved the puzzle in 0.38 seconds—a 40-percent improvement over the previous record of 0.637. Read more

DESIGN

The carbon fiber pi bike is completely irrational, but totally ridable by designboom.com

March 14th is here again. it’s different than usual years. stephen hawking’s death is sobering amidst cheap puns, baked-pie homages, and the country’s fleeting appreciation for a long string of irrational numbers; everyone celebrates pi day differently. some acknowledge the trillion-digit decimal’s infinite beauty for a few seconds, while others, like martijn koomen and tadas maksimovas get to work — designing and building a fully functional fixed-gear bicycle in tribute to an enigmatic, mathematical constant. Read more