Best Tech Stories around the web #200

This week: China wants to build the 1st power station in space, website uses AI to create infinite fake faces, new robot science museum will construct itself in Seoul and Google Earth reveals Taiwan’s secret military bases.

INNOVATION

China Wants to Build the First Power Station in Space by bloomberg.com

Following its successful and world-beating trip to the far side of the moon, China is preparing to build a solar power station in space, as the world’s No. 2 economy strives to burnish its superpower credentials. With an $8 billion annual budget for its space program, second only to the U.S., China is seeking to compete with its rival for economic, military and technological dominance. Read more

CONTENT

Website uses AI to create infinite fake faces by engadget.com

You might already know that AI can put real faces in implausible scenarios, but it's now clear that it can create faces that otherwise wouldn't exist. Developer Phillip Wang has created a website, ThisPersonDoesNotExist, that uses AI to generate a seemingly infinite variety of fake but plausible-looking faces. His tool uses an NVIDIA-designed generative adversarial network (where algorithms square off against each other to improve the quality of results) to craft faces using a large catalog of photos as training material. Read more

DESIGN

New robot science museum will construct itself in seoul by designboom.com

Turkish practice melike altınışık architects (MAA) presents the winning entry for an international competition for the robot science museum in seoul, south korea. hosted by the seoul metropolitan government, the competition called for the design of the world’s first pioneer robot science museum (RSM) to support public education in robotics and increase public knowledge and interest in robots. Read more

QUERKY

Google Earth spills the beans, reveals Taiwan’s secret military bases by digitaltrends.com

The latest Google Earth 3D Maps update has accidentally exposed Taiwan’s most secret military bases to the public — and its adversaries. Some of the locations available in full three-dimensional detail include a facility which houses Patriot missiles, and the country’s National Security Bureau, according to a report from The South China Morning Post. Read more